Videos About the First World War

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David Spencer's Education Paragon is a free educational resource portal helping David Spencer's secondary school students, their parents and teaching colleagues with understanding, designing, applying and delivering assessment, curriculum, educational resources, evaluation and literacy skills accurately and effectively. This wiki features educational resources for Indigenous Aboriginal education, field trips for educators, Davids Music Jam, law and justice education, music education and outdoor, environmental and experiential education. Since our web site launch 10.5 years ago on September 27, 2006, online site statistics and web rankings indicate there are currently 1,868 pages and 11,682,604 page views using 7.85 Gig of bandwidth per month. Pages are written, edited, published and hosted by Brampton, Ontario, Canada based educator David Spencer. On social media, you may find David as @DavidSpencerEdu on Twitter, as DavidSpencerdotca on Linkedin.com and DavidSpencer on Prezi. Please send your accolades, feedback and resource suggestions to David Spencer. Share on social media with the hashtag #EducationParagon


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Videos About the First World War

  • First World War Documentaries from The War Amps of Canada Five (5) videos available as of February 3, 2009
    On June 28, 1914, Archduke Francis Ferdinand, the heir to the Austrian and Hungarian thrones, was assassinated. Thanks to a complex web of alliances, and a month of failed negotiations, the First World War began in August 1914. Britain declared war on Germany on the 4th. This meant that Canada, still considered part of the British empire, was also at war automatically. By the end of the war, though, Canada had earned the right to sign the peace treaty as an independent nation. Unfortunately, this "birth of a nation" came at a cost. More than 60,000 Canadian soldiers were dead. NEVER AGAIN!

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