Nunavut

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David Spencer's Education Paragon is a free educational resource portal helping David Spencer's secondary school students, their parents and teaching colleagues with understanding, designing, applying and delivering assessment, curriculum, educational resources, evaluation and literacy skills accurately and effectively. This wiki features educational resources for Indigenous Aboriginal education, field trips for educators, Davids Music Jam, law and justice education, music education and outdoor, environmental and experiential education. Since our web site launch on September 27, 2006, online site statistics and web rankings indicate there are currently 1,878 pages and 14,603,137 page views using 7.85 Gig of bandwidth per month. Pages are written, edited, published and hosted by Brampton, Ontario, Canada based educator David Spencer. On social media, you may find David as @DavidSpencerEdu on Twitter, as DavidSpencerdotca on Linkedin.com and DavidSpencer on Prezi. Please send your accolades, feedback and resource suggestions to David Spencer. Share on social media with the hashtag #EducationParagon. Thank you for visiting.


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Nunavut

The ratification of the Nunavut Act occured in the year 1993. The actual birth of Nunavut was on April 1, 1999. Parties, speeches, fireworks, traditional Inuit games and dances, and other activities marked the occasion.

History of Nunavut

Europeans began exerting a more long-lasting influence in the Arctic with the formation of the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) in 1670. Rapidly establishing a commercial network throughout the Arctic, the HBC relied on the Inuit to supply furs and hides in return for tools and food. This caused substantial changes in Inuit culture: on one level, the focus shifted from hunting entirely for food, clothing, and other needs, to supplying outsiders with desirable goods. Traditional trade and migration patterns were altered, as the Inuit began trading almost exclusively with the HBC, abandoning their seasonal migrations to remain near trading posts. This influence continued into the twentieth century. When the Canadian government began asserting its sovereignty over the Arctic, the HBC acted as a de facto government agency. Unfortunately, when the fur market collapsed in the 1930s, the Inuit were left without the means to continue a way of life to which they had grown accustomed.

more...
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/confederation/023001-2275-e.html



Map of Nunavut

nunavut_communities.jpg
Map of Nunavut from The Atlas of Canada:Natural Resources Canada