Net Generation

From David Spencer's Education Paragon: Helping students develop citizenship, faith, literacy, responsibility and vision
Jump to: navigation, search

David Spencer's Education Paragon is a free educational resource portal helping David Spencer's secondary school students, their parents and teaching colleagues with understanding, designing, applying and delivering assessment, curriculum, educational resources, evaluation and literacy skills accurately and effectively. This wiki features educational resources for Indigenous Aboriginal education, field trips for educators, Davids Music Jam, law and justice education, music education and outdoor, environmental and experiential education. Since our web site launch 10.5 years ago on September 27, 2006, online site statistics and web rankings indicate there are currently 1,868 pages and 11,682,604 page views using 7.85 Gig of bandwidth per month. Pages are written, edited, published and hosted by Brampton, Ontario, Canada based educator David Spencer. On social media, you may find David as @DavidSpencerEdu on Twitter, as DavidSpencerdotca on Linkedin.com and DavidSpencer on Prezi. Please send your accolades, feedback and resource suggestions to David Spencer. Share on social media with the hashtag #EducationParagon


< Home Flagcanadamini.gif | Categories | Courses | Educators | Glossary | Images | Literacy | New | Parents | Popular | Search | Students

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z



Net Generation

The Net Generation are people born between 1980 and 2000 who have been immersed in technology. Also known as Millennials, or the Millennial Generation and Generation Y.

"Are you 22 or younger? Have you ever had to help your parents with the computer? Then you belong to the Net Generation." {Riverdeep Today, 2000])

America currently contains about 88 million members of the Net Generation. These "N-Geners" are kids who have been manipulating mouses since an early age. While past generations made do with the telephone and television, today's generation has access to those devices and super-realistic video games, the Internet, e-mail, instant messaging, online communities, and videos and music that can be downloaded over a computer.

Mark Prensky coined the term "digital native" to describe Generation Y "K through college" students in 2001, explaining they "represent the first generations to grow up with this new technology."

In their 2007 book, authors Junco and Mastrodicasa rsearched and found that 97% of these students owned a computer, 94% owned a cell phone, and 56% owned an MP3 player.

In 2010, research was published in the Elon Journal of Undergraduate Research which claimed that students who used social media and decided to quit showed the same withdrawal symptoms of a drug addict who quit their stimulant. (Cabral, J. (2010). Is Generation Y Addicted to Social Media. The Elon Journal of Undergraduate Research in Communication, 2(1), 5-13.)

Web Resources

Books