First Nations Films

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Aboriginal Education and Native Studies Resources from David Spencer's Education Paragon

  • Connect with Aboriginal elders and educators and join Native Education Association of Ontario Circle (NEAO Circle) formerly The Aboriginal and Environmental Education Circle (AEE Circle) e-newsletter. The NEAO Circle is a professional learning and sharing network of educators, teachers, college instructors, university professors, Aboriginal elders and leaders. Through e-mail, they share First Nation, Metis and Inuit and native studies resources, curriculum and teaching strategies that will help Canadian teachers integrate school curriculum with current cultural, environmental and historical contributions of our Canadian First Nations, Inuit and Metis brothers and sisters.
  • Join the Native Education Association of Ontario and NEAO Circle on Facebook.
  • See photos and read about past gatherings of The Aboriginal and Environmental Education Circle (AEE Circle).
  • Join the First Nation, Metis & Inuit Education Association of Ontario (FNMIEAO) the Ontario Ministry of Education recognized provincial subject association for teachers and educators of First Nation, Metis & Inuit Studies and Native Languages. From 2011 to May 2014, this subject association was previously called the Native Education Association of Ontario (NEAO). Special thanks to Marg Boyle for her three years of leadership, encouragement and support.
  • The shortcut to this page is http://aboriginal.davidspencer.ca.


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Films with First Nations Themes

  1. Aboriginal Architecture Living Architecture A fascinating look at the contemporary architecture of seven Native communities. From the National Film Board of Canada (NFB)
  2. Aboriginality from the National Film Board of Canada (NFB)
  3. Justice Denied from the National Film Board of Canada (NFB)
  4. 360 Degrees rom the National Film Board of Canada (NFB)
  5. How the Fiddle Flows rom the National Film Board of Canada (NFB)


Online Films with First Nations Themes

  1. "Finding Dawn" directed by Christine Welsh, 2006, 73 min 29 s Credits
    a NFB (National Film Board of Canada) documentary that calls into question the murders and disappearances of over 500 Aboriginal women in Canada over the past 30 years. Acclaimed Métis filmmaker Christine Welsh presents a compelling documentary that puts a human face on a national tragedy: the murders and disappearances of an estimated 500 Aboriginal women in Canada over the past 30 years. This is a journey into the dark heart of Native women's experience in Canada. From Vancouver's Skid Row to the Highway of Tears in northern British Columbia to Saskatoon, this film honours those who have passed and uncovers reasons for hope. Finding Dawn illustrates the deep historical, social and economic factors that contribute to the epidemic of violence against Native women in this country.
  2. "Gene Boy Came Home" directed by Alanis Obomsawin,2007,24 min 31 sec. An NFB (National Film Board of Canada) documentary by celebrated filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin is a portrait of Eugene "Gene Boy" (pronounced Genie Boy) Benedict, from Odanak Indian Reserve (near Montreal, Quebec). At 17, he enlisted in the US Marines and was sent to the frontlines of the Vietnam War. This film is the account of his 2 years of service and his long journey back to Odanak afterwards.
  3. "Ikwe" directed by Norma Bailey, 1986, 57 min Credits
    A NFB (National Film Board of Canada) film from the Daughters of the Country series, this dramatic film features a young Ojibwa girl from 1770 who marries a Scottish fur trader and leaves home for the shores of Georgian Bay. Although the union is beneficial for her tribe, it results in hardship and isolation for Ikwe. Values and customs clash until, finally, the events of a dream Ikwe once had unfold with tragic clarity.
  4. "Mistress Madeleine" Directed by Aaron Kim Johnston, 1986, 57 min 1 s Credits
    A NFB (National Film Board of Canada) film from the Daughters of the Country series, this film, set in the 1850s, unfolds against the backdrop of the Hudson's Bay Company's monopoly of the fur trade. In protest, some Métis engage in trade with the Americans. Madeleine, the Métis common-law wife of a Hudson's Bay Company clerk, is torn between loyalty to her husband and loyalty to her brother, a freetrader. Even more shattering, a change in company policy destroys Madeleine's happy and secure life, forcing her to re-evaluate her identity.
  5. "Places Not Our Own" Directed by Derek Mazur, 1986, 57 min 10 s Credits
    Part of the Daughters of the Country series, this dramatic film set in 1929 depicts how Canada's West, home to generations of Métis, was taken over by the railroads and new settlers. As a result, the Métis became a forgotten people, forced to eke out a living as best they could. At the forefront is Rose, a woman determined to provide her children with a normal life and an education despite the odds. But due to their harsh circumstances, a devastating and traumatic event transpires instead.

First Nations Film Producers' Organizations

  1. The American Indian Film Institute (AIFI) is a non-profit media arts center founded in 1979 to foster understanding of the culture, traditions and issues of contemporary Native Americans.