Facts on Canada's Involvement in the First World War

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Facts on Canada's Involvement in the First World War

  1. Canada entered the war in 1914.
  2. Almost 620,000 Canadian men and women served in the First World War at a time when the population of the country was only a few million.
  3. Of these, more than 66,000 were killed.
  4. At the Battle of the Somme, British Forces suffered their heaviest one-day loss ever, more than 57,000 men. More than 700 men from the Newfoundland regiment were killed or injured during this battle.
  5. Four Canadians were awarded the Victoria Cross, the Commonwealth's highest award for bravery, for their part in capturing Vimy Ridge.
  6. Canadian John McCrae wrote the poem "In Flanders Fields" while on the battlefield.
  7. During the course of the war, Canada's naval service grew from 350 men and two ships to a force of 9,000 men and 100 ships.




References