Didgeridoo

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David Spencer's Education Paragon is a free educational resource portal helping David Spencer's secondary school students, their parents and teaching colleagues with understanding, designing, applying and delivering assessment, curriculum, educational resources, evaluation and literacy skills accurately and effectively. This wiki features educational resources for Indigenous Aboriginal education, field trips for educators, Davids Music Jam, law and justice education, music education and outdoor, environmental and experiential education. Since our web site launch 10.5 years ago on September 27, 2006, online site statistics and web rankings indicate there are currently 1,868 pages and 11,682,604 page views using 7.85 Gig of bandwidth per month. Pages are written, edited, published and hosted by Brampton, Ontario, Canada based educator David Spencer. On social media, you may find David as @DavidSpencerEdu on Twitter, as DavidSpencerdotca on Linkedin.com and DavidSpencer on Prezi. Please send your accolades, feedback and resource suggestions to David Spencer. Share on social media with the hashtag #EducationParagon


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Didgeridoo

"The didgeridoo (also known as a didjeridu) is a wind instrument developed by Indigenous Australians of northern Australia around 1,500 years ago and still in widespread use today both in Australia and around the world. It is sometimes described as a natural wooden trumpet or "drone pipe". Musicologists classify it as a brass aerophone." Source: Wikipedia contributors".
Didgeridoo." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 7 Mar. 2013. Web. 7 Mar. 2013.

Important facts and tips about the Didgeridoo from the Didgeridoo Store in Fremantle, Washington

  1. The didgeridoo is one of oldest woodwind instruments in the world
  2. It originated in northern Australia and is played by the indigenous tribes of the land
  3. Didgeridoos are traditionally made from eucalyptus trees that are naturally hollowed out by termites
  4. The mouthpiece end can have beeswax applied to make it more comfortable to play and a better size to seal the vibration
  5. Didgeridoos play in different keys or pitches depending on the shape, length, width and wall thickness
  6. Sit in a comfortable position, upright, so you can breath easy
  7. Play in an area that has good acoustics so the sound you make bounces back to you. This way you are hearing more of the sound that everyone else hears, not the dull vibration you can hear in your head. The kitchen or bathroom works great!


Instructional Videos for Learning to Play the Didgeridoo