Africville

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David Spencer's Education Paragon is a free educational resource portal helping David Spencer's secondary school students, their parents and teaching colleagues with understanding, designing, applying and delivering assessment, curriculum, educational resources, evaluation and literacy skills accurately and effectively. This wiki features educational resources for Indigenous Aboriginal education, field trips for educators, Davids Music Jam, law and justice education, music education and outdoor, environmental and experiential education. Since our web site launch 10.5 years ago on September 27, 2006, online site statistics and web rankings indicate there are currently 1,868 pages and 11,682,604 page views using 7.85 Gig of bandwidth per month. Pages are written, edited, published and hosted by Brampton, Ontario, Canada based educator David Spencer. On social media, you may find David as @DavidSpencerEdu on Twitter, as DavidSpencerdotca on Linkedin.com and DavidSpencer on Prezi. Please send your accolades, feedback and resource suggestions to David Spencer. Share on social media with the hashtag #EducationParagon


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Africville

In 1967 Halifax government officials razed the community of Africville with bulldozers in the name of "urban renewal," uprooting its 400 black residents.

"Africville certainly didn't start off as a slum. Donald Claremont, a sociology professor at Dalhousie University, describes how — at the turn of the century in 1900 — Africville was a community of young, hard-working people with much potential. The history of Africville can be traced back to 1838 when descendants of American slaves settled on the northern edge of Halifax. It was initially known as Campbell Road but, because of its black population, it was quickly dubbed Africville." Source: Archives.cbc.ca

In mid-1954, the city manager submitted to Halifax city council a report that recommended the shifting of Africville residents to city-owned property southwest of the existing community. The report stated: "The area is not suited for residences, but, properly developed, is ideal for industrial purposes. There is water frontage for piers, the railway for sidings, a road to be developed leading directly downtown and in the other direction to the provincial highway."

"On July 5, 2002, Heritage Minister Sheila Copps declares the former neighbourhood known as Africville a national historic site. The official recognition comes 35 years after Halifax officials razed the community in the name of "urban renewal," uprooting its 400 black residents. The forced relocation meant an entire generation suffered because of the city's actions, reports CBC's Thomas Ledwell.

"This is a happy event for some but yet this is a sad event for me ... to think I lost my birthplace for a park," says Dr. Ruth Johnson, who was in her 50s when her home was levelled." Source: Archives.cbc.ca

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