Aboriginal Clothing

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David Spencer's Education Paragon is a free educational resource portal helping David Spencer's secondary school students, their parents and teaching colleagues with understanding, designing, applying and delivering assessment, curriculum, educational resources, evaluation and literacy skills accurately and effectively. This wiki features educational resources for Indigenous Aboriginal education, field trips for educators, Davids Music Jam, law and justice education, music education and outdoor, environmental and experiential education. Since our web site launch 9.5 years ago on September 27, 2006, online site statistics and web rankings indicate there are currently 1,867 pages and 10,515,044 page views using 7.85 Gig of bandwidth per month. Pages are written, edited, published and hosted by Brampton, Ontario, Canada based educator David Spencer. On social media, you may find David as @DavidSpencerEdu on Twitter, as DavidSpencerdotca on Linkedin.com and DavidSpencer on Prezi. Please send your accolades, feedback and resource suggestions to David Spencer. Share on social media with the hashtag #EducationParagon


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Canadian Aboriginal Clothing

Mukluks-deerhide-450.jpg

deerhide mukluks
Mukluks created by Moose Cree First Nation reserve in James Bay in north central Ontario in 1981.

These brown mukluks are made of deer hide. The fringe is made of deer hide. The white liners are made from pressed felt (wool).

Ojibway aboriginal women still use different bead patterns depending on their family and tribe ancestry.

These mukluks will keep feet warm to - 45 0 C. They must be worn on dry cold snow in at least - 5 0 C temperature. This style of mukluk is usually worn for snowshoeing.


Mitts-moosehide-2-450.jpg

moosehide mitts
Moosehide mitts created by Cree aboriginal people of the Pickle Lake reserve in north western Ontario in 1979. Pickle Lake, "Ontario's Last Frontier", is the most northerly community in Ontario that is accessible year-round by road. This huge wilderness is only 300 miles from the coast of Hudson Bay, Ontario's subarctic.

These brown mitts are made of moose hide. The fringe is made of deer hide. The fur trim is from a beaver.

Cree aboriginal women still use different bead patterns depending on their family and tribe ancestry.

These mitts will keep hands warm to - 45 0 C.



Mocassins-deerhide-450.jpg

moccasins
Moccasins created by Chippewa aboriginal people of the Mnjikaning (Rama) First Nation north east of Orillia, Ontario in 1992.

These brown moccasins are made of deer hide.

Chippewa aboriginal women still use different bead patterns depending on their family and tribe ancestry.



necklace
Necklace created by Moose Cree First Nation reserve in James Bay in north central Ontario in 1984.



Snowshoes-wood-1.jpg

wood snowshoes



Snowshoes-wood-2-creek.jpg

ski poles and wood snowshoes

Aboriginal Clothing External Links